Filters 

A while back, I thought about how we all view each other and the world from our eyes, but the image is masked by our own personal filter. Like on an Instagram picture, you can increase or decrease an image’s beauty based on the filter you use, and sometimes a filter is unnecessary. Let’s discuss those images that unluckily get stuck with the wrong filter. We are the pictures, how others view us are the filters. Sometimes we can determine an initial filter that we hope to present, but these filters find themselves altered by those around us. The beauty that is hidden with the wrong filter can be monumental. For example, say there was this wonderful person. They’re vibrant, bubbly, flirtatious, and a bit sarcastic at times (but only in good fun). There’s the overwhelmed filter: the way someone would view this person, because they don’t enjoy the energy they bring, and feel it disrupts the peace. Then we have the insecure filter: this perception is a result of the person feeling as though any random sentence spoken is directly targeted at them in a negative way, all of the time. Then we have the jealous filter: this one results from envying this person’s ability to attract attention and admiration. Then we have the no filter option: the person is seen for exactly who they are. Then there is the magnified filter: this view comes from a deep admiration for the person. They accept them for who they are, and go beyond even that, by appreciating these characteristics for the personality they comprise.Typically the filters we have for viewing others are a reflection of our best and worst qualities. If we’re insecure, we are unnecessarily hateful. If we’re sad, we’re negative, or apathetic. If we’re too analytical, we see the world from a clinical kind of perspective. If we’re content, we see people for who they are. If we’re high on life, we see the beautiful traits in others, and celebrate the unique qualities they possess. These aren’t only ways we view people, but also how we view our own lives and the things that surround us.

So take a moment next time you sense you’re being overly negative about another person, and contemplate whether or not that same filter is the one you use to view your life.

#4. “If I were a guy”: don’t be a fool on social media

#4. “If I were a guy”: don’t be a fool on social media.
Many times I have been in the process of getting to know a guy, and he’ll post something that completely turns me in the opposite direction.
What guys have done right in this situation:
• kept their emotions to themselves and didn’t post their rage.
• didn’t put pictures of them looking high.
• didn’t subscribe to pages that consist of naked, exposed bodies.
• didn’t share anything that they wouldn’t want their girlfriend to replicate for social media (e. g. Twerking videos, slutty dancing videos, pictures in their bras and thongs, naked pictures, etc.

If I was a guy trying to get the girl I like to go on a date with me, here’s what I wouldn’t do:
•Share inappropriate videos
•Like pictures of naked people
•Post about something that really made me mad
•Post a status with terrible punctuation and grammar